The latest research and analysis from the BRC


The British Retail Consortium produces unbiased research and analysis on retail performance and the economic drivers influencing the British retail industry. The MIA’s Membership with the BRC gives us access to an expanded portfolio of content to share with our members. We’re pleased to share the headline statistics from these reports on retail sales, footfall and inflation: 

Retail Sales: Shoppers tighten belts once again as sales fall 

Headline Statistics: 

  • On a Total basis, sales decreased by 1.0% in June, against an increase of 10.4% in June 2021. This is below the 3-month average decline of 0.8% and the 12-month average growth of 3.0%.
  • UK retail sales decreased 1.3% on a Like-for-like basis from June 2021, when they had increased 6.7%. This was above the 3-month average decline of 1.5% and below the 12-month average growth of 1.0%.
  • Over the three months to June, Food sales increased 1.6% on a Like-for-like basis and 2.2% on a Total basis. This is above the 12-month Total average growth of 0.6%. For the month of June, Food was in growth year-on-year.
  • Over the three-months to June, Non-Food retail sales decreased by 4.2% on a like-for-like basis and 3.3% on a Total basis. This is below the 12-month Total average growth of 5.0%. For the month of June, Non-Food was in decline year-on-year.
  • Online Non-Food sales decreased by 9.1% in June, against a decline of 5.9% in June 2021. This is above the 3-mth average decline of 10.3%. The Non-Food Online penetration rate decreased from 43.3% in June 2021 to 39.4% this June.
  • Over the three months to June, In-Store sales of Non-Food items increased 2.2% on a Total basis and 0.6% on a Like-for-like basis since June 2021. This is below the 12-month growth of 35.5%.

Commentary: 

Helen Dickinson OBE, Chief Executive, British Retail Consortium, said:

“Sales volumes are falling to a rate not seen since the depths of the pandemic, as inflation continues to bite, and households cut back spending. Discretionary purchases were hit hard, especially white goods and homeware, while consumers also traded down to cheaper brands in food and non-food alike. While the Jubilee weekend gave food sales a temporary boost, and fashion sales benefited from the summer holiday and wedding season, this was not enough to counter the substantial slowdown in consumer spending.

“Retailers are caught between significant rising costs in their supply chains and protecting their customers from price rises. The government needs to get creative and find ways to help relieve some of this cost pressure – the upcoming consultation on transitional relief is a golden opportunity to ensure that retailers aren’t overpaying on their business rates bills. Government action on transitional relief would make a meaningful difference to retailers’ costs and ease pressure on prices for customers.”

Footfall: Footfall rises as consumers shop around 

Headline Statistics:

  • Total UK footfall decreased by 10.5% in June (Yo3Y), a 2.0 percentage point improvement from May. This is better than the 3-month average decline of 11.8%.
  • Footfall on High Streets declined by 13.9% in June (Yo3Y), 0.3 percentage points worse than last month’s rate but an improvement on the 3-month average decline of 14.8%.
  • Retail Parks saw footfall decrease by 8.1% (Yo3Y), 1.8 percentage points worse than last month’s rate and was worse than the 3-month average decline of 7.0%.
  • Shopping Centre footfall declined by 24.1% (Yo3Y), 2.6 percentage points better than last month’s rate and above the 3-month average decline of 25.9%.

Commentary: 

Helen Dickinson OBE, BRC Chief Executive, said:

“The cost-of-living crisis appears to be driving more people to shop around for the best deals both online and in-store, with the number of visits to individual shops rising in June. This was boosted by the Jubilee celebrations and summer heatwave, which more than compensated for the impact of the rail strikes on city centre footfall. However, this has not translated into in-store and online sales, with volumes down significantly in recent months as consumers tightened their belts.

“Rising inflation, particularly soaring energy costs, is limiting customer spending power and damaging consumer confidence. This is only set to worsen in October as the energy price cap rises and the colder weather increases usage. With many people struggling, retailers are doing all they can to support their most vulnerable customers – from expanding value ranges to offering discounts to vulnerable groups, raising staff pay and investing in lower prices for the future.”

Inflation: Prices rising as costs bear down 

Headline Statistics:

  • Shop Price annual inflation accelerated to 3.1% in June, up from 2.8% in May. This is above the 12- and 6-month average price increases of 0.9% and 2.1%, respectively. This marks the highest rate of inflation since October 2008.
  • Food inflation strongly accelerated to 5.6% in June, up from 4.3% in May. This is above the 12- and 6-month average price growth rates of 1.9% and 3.5%, respectively. This is the highest inflation rate since June 2011.
  • Non-Food inflation decelerated to 1.9% in June, settling down from 2.0% in May. This is above the 12- and 6-month average price increases of 0.3% and 1.3%, respectively. Inflation remains close to the series’ high.
  • Fresh Food inflation strongly accelerated in June to 6.2%, up from 4.5% in May. This is above the 12- and 6-month average price growth rates of 2.0% and 3.8%, respectively. This is the highest inflation rate since May 2009.
  • Ambient Food inflation accelerated to 4.8% in June, up from 4.0% in May. This is above the 12- and 6-month average price increases of 2.0% and 3.1%, respectively. This is the highest rate of increase since May 2012.

Commentary: 

Helen Dickinson OBE, Chief Executive, British Retail Consortium, said:

“Last month households and businesses were hit by the highest rate of inflation since the 1980s as near-record commodity prices in energy, transport and food filtered their way down the supply-chain. Consequently, domestic food prices rose sharply, particularly for fresh food products such as cheese which has been impacted by the spiralling costs of fertiliser and feed. With no end in sight to the Ukraine-Russia conflict, costs are unlikely to come down immediately as the impact of the war takes hold.”

“As households are facing the biggest real-terms pay cut this side of the century, and despite ever-increasing input costs, retailers remain committed to protecting their customers. Fierce competition for market share means that supermarkets will continue try to absorb as much of these costs as possible and look for savings elsewhere. They continue to expand their value ranges, keeping the cost of essentials down and are providing discounts for vulnerable groups. The BRC will keep working with retailers to find additional ways to protect retailers from price rises, however Government should stand ready to take action to support struggling households.”


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